There are some hard lives out there. I’m always appreciative of how lucky I’ve been in life – without ever using it as a complacent reason to say “this is good enough, no further, no more.” There always seems to be a pull in much dialogue about the world to either say things are awful, or things aren’t bad – my view is things don’t have to be awful to believe that we can look to the future and say we can make it better. I dislike hysteria on the one hand, and defeatism on the other. It seems to be a very British trait sometimes to declare everything to be crap (all politicians, all business, all of the left/right wing, all classes, all people…) as a defensive posture in which an individual gives themselves permission to not engage, not get involved, not even try. Ah well!

In the nice things of my current year – are we really a third of the way through it already? – I was invited to write an entry for the exhibition catalogue accompanying Chris Gollon: Beyond The Horizon, an exhibition at Huddersfield Art Gallery running from 5 October 2019 to 11 January 2020. My connection to Gollon’s work arose directly from the Thurston Moore book We Sing A New Language. Gollon was one of the invited artists who took part in the ROOT project of 1998 and, interviewing him, I was enthralled by the way he spoke of his creative process, the way ideas merged and combined within an overall work – stellar stuff. One thing led to another, David Tregunna – Gollon’s friend and manager – was kind enough to invite me to a showing in London where Eleanor McEvoy performed pieces from her album Naked Music which was entwined with artworks from Gollon…And at the end of the evening I headed off having agreed I wanted to buy an artwork and the connection continued. My only regret is I was trying to be so polite and respectful of Gollon’s time that I didn’t go over and say hi – a chance I’ve lost forever more, a true shame.

Nick Soulsby, Thurston Moore & ‘House of Sleep’

Friday I depart for Lisbon for a long overdue few days away from work where I’ll sit in sunshine, work on the upcoming book on Lydia Lunch – and attend the premiere of Marco Porsia’s movie SWANS: Where Does A Body End?

I’ve seen several cuts of the movie over the past couple years and it’s been amazing watching the shaping and crafting that goes into it, the multiple dimensions being taken into account, the energy that Marco has had to put into it. The other amazing thing has been to see a film that many times and always be enthralled – there’s just so much great material, the story is compelling, the way it’s been constructed is hard to turn away from. I’m really looking forward to see it on the big screen on Friday evening. A week later I’ll then attend the showing in Brussels. Keep watching, lot more showings to come:

https://www.wheredoesabodyend.com/new-events

I’ve also been invited to attend the Pop Kultur Festival in August in Berlin – my first ever visit to the city and, typically, my friend who lives there is going to be trekking in Bavaria! I’ll be taking part in a panel at the festival then giving a workshop on oral history and music – really looking forward to putting the work in ready for that.

homepage 2019

Another odd link back to We Sing A New Language came when Oltrarno Recordings got in touch to ask if I would be willing to take a look at Massimo Farjon Pupillo’s first solo album. The answer was a definite yes. I’ve seen Massimo’s work in ZU – love that band – and he’s been a regular collaborator with numerous groups and individuals inhabiting the ‘out there’ realms of music. Glad I did look at it, two gargantuan twenty minute compositions plus a cover of the always beautiful All The Pretty Little Horses:

https://www.popmatters.com/massimo-farjon-pupillo-review-2635385964.html

I also took time to go back through my front-to-back catalogue of Sunn O))), definitely one of my favourite bands of all time. Life Metal, pleasant, definitely nowhere near as glorious as Monoliths & Dimensions – ‘Alice’ is an immaculate composition.

https://www.popmatters.com/sunn-o-life-metal-review-2635722537.html

Anyways, it’s an honour to get the chance to encounter the people and their works – constant delight.

 

 

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First things first, where am I going to be on Friday May 3, 2019? Attending the premiere of Marco Porsia’s film “SWANS: Where Does A Body End?” at the Indie Lisboa International Independent Film Festival. And the 6th May? Right back at the same venue for the second screening. How about Friday 10th May? Oh that’s different. I’ll be in Brussels for a weekend break…And watching the third screening of the movie.

Over the past couple of years I’ve had the honour of seeing several rough cuts of the movie at various stages in it’s development and it’s amazing how much has gone into the work – and how powerful I’ve found it each and every time. Breathtaking.

Busy past month beavering away on various endeavours – around which there’s still been time for music. Record Store Day, I visited Specialist Subject Records at The Exchange here in Bristol – it’s on my front door and jeez…This crew make me feel like I’ve only scratched the surface of the current music scenes afoot in the U.K. and around the world. Just a sea of underground and indie vinyl from bands I find myself looking up over and again. I wound up walking out – after a very pleasant chat with the staff – with:

Birds in Row “We Already Lost The World”

https://birdsinrow.bandcamp.com/album/we-already-lost-the-world

Television Personalities “Some Kind of Happening: Singles 1978-1989”

https://recordstoreday.co.uk/releases/rsd-2019/television-personalities/

And, finally: Bossk “Audio Noir”

I had bought the I/II reissue on a previous visit so I was helpless to not wide up with Audio Noir this time around (https://bosskband.bandcamp.com/album/i-ii-reissue-3).

Around that I’ve been taking time to fill in my collection of Burial 12″s and spending time with Leyland Kirby’s latest (final?) utterance as The Caretaker – things of beauty. check out Bliss Signal too!

Reading-wise, I can’t speak highly enough of How To Survive A Plague by David France (https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/dec/12/how-to-survive-a-plague-review-david-france-activists-aids-treatment-hiv). By the final chapter, when there’s finally a true chink of light and hope, I found myself tearing up and gulping with relief – totally sucked into this account of people striving to survive, to protect loved ones, to claw their way into the consciousness of a world that wanted to pretend these weren’t real people deserving of care or attention. Amazing.

Well that’s nice. Back in 2015 I put together a brief story based on the ‘I Found My Friends’ oral history I’d put together from the memories of the bands who performed alongside Nirvana 1987-1994.

View at Medium.com

There’s not much I really have to add about Cobain at a quarter century distance from his death. Amid the clickbait and web-space filler there are plenty of respectful and insightful pieces out there, so much information! In terms of modern figures, Cobain might be one of the most reviewed, video’ed, recorded, written about…What can I say?

https://www.scenepointblank.com/features/regular-columns/guest-column-nick-soulsby-let-sun-come/

Loren and the team at Scene Point Blank were kind enough to let me provide a rambling description of the kinds of thoughts that motivate me when looking at music, musicians, books, life in general – then to point to why I feel SWANS and Michael Gira are so unique in this respect.

Page two offers some cheerful easy-listening tunes to accompany thought time this afternoon. Viva Swans!

 

 

https://www.gofundme.com/w6ste-genesis-breyer-porridge

Genesis P-Orridge, to me, is a rare example of an individual who has been brave enough to make their entire life a site of experimentation and change. With true artists there’s sometimes an air of ‘they go there so we pedestrian civilian types don’t have to’ – that’s definitely true with Genesis but what I admire most is that, throughout all these transgressions over the decades, there’s a person who values humanity and kindness at the centre of it all.

Reading the various works looking at his music history, his art work, even some of the volumes related to his esoteric magick interests, there’s a breadth of thinking and energy there that awes me. Across Coum Transmissions, Throbbing Gristle, Psychic TV and beyond there’s always an attempt to explore an idea, then move on and seek something new. I admire that kind of questing behaviour because it can be so easy to settle into a single groove and dig it deeper to no great end.

Currently, Genesis is extremely ill, I’m hoping people have a little spare change and so forth that they’d be willing to drop into the Go Fund Me to keep him comfortable at this time.

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/new-books-network/e/58779912

This was a bit of an honour and a pleasure. An author called Steve Naish caught me late last year and inquired whether I was open to being interviewed for the New Books Network (it’s also available on iTunes.)

Always a pleasure to have a conversation with someone: as a basic philosophy, I think humans require input in order to process it into meaningful or worthwhile output. That seems simplistic (it is) but what I mean is all the time in the world sitting in a room dreaming and musing doesn’t add up to anything compared to the momentum created by external stimuli and impetus. One would think that writing was a solitary business, something one did alone, but I think it’s swifter and more productive when it involves other people day by day to keep it moving and give something to play with or push against.

Steve’s most recent work is Riffs And Meaning: Manic Street Preachers and Know Your Enemy. It immediately appealed to me personally because, on the first dubbed cassette of Nirvana I ever heard, way back in 1993, the space at the end of Side B had been filled with two Manics songs: ‘Vision Of Dead Desire’ and ‘You Love Us’. Killer tunes. But then I dived so completely into American music that I lost track of them altogether. Worse, MTV played that fecking awful ‘Design For Life’ song over and over for an entire summer of my teenhood and I couldn’t bring myself to touch the band. A few belated attempts to return to The Holy Bible never really picked up pace…

…Which is where I’ve been verrrrrry pleased to find this book and gain a context that made me want to go back and look over Manic Street Preachers. There’s something about reading passionate words and analysis that makes me look again with fresh eyes – gets me every time.

https://headpress.com/product/riffs-and-meaning/

https://www.popmatters.com/green-river-2019-re-issues-2628275330.html

I reviewed the two new Green River reissues for Pop Matters last week: so darn good! A definite recommendation on my part.