The Market for Nirvana Tickets: the Brixton Academy Perspective

Posted: January 24, 2014 in Nirvana News

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/jan/24/nirvana-gigs-kurt-cobain-dead-london-brixton-academy

I recall one reason I really hated the Sandford biography of Kurt Cobain was that it situated a Nirvana show at Brixton Academy in 1992 for some reason – that was one of the more minor factual errors in a book riddled with them. Actually, while I’m on the topic, I’d have to say that’s the only book I ever was so bothered by I took the time to write a review on Amazon.co.uk calling it out on disgraceful use of sources, endless factual errors, a visible absence of proof reading meaning the writer would say the precise opposite of a previous statement just a few chapters after an initial opinion…It’s a disgrace that book…I mean, one chapter begins with a scene in which, in amidst the fall of the Berlin Wall, Cobain is spotted on a rooftop being done anally by another man – I mean, how was he spotted, identified, why would he be on a roof, where’s the evidence, what the hell?! He also accuses Cobain of beating a man into a coma in the mid-Eighties – again, no sign of this elsewhere. it’s one of the most amazing hatchet jobs I’ve ever seen, a true disgrace. The author basically has a belief that Cobain’s deification was leading teens to believe suicide was cool and that, therefore, denigrating Cobain, destroying his image, would lead people to reject him. Stunning – can’t believe it ended up in print.

Anyways, I digress. A neat little finale for a Friday, an excerpt from a new book describing the reaction at Brixton Academy to the death of Cobain. I actually like its honesty – when faced with hundreds of thousands in claims for refunds is there any individual who wouldn’t be kinda focused on the personal impact rather than the distant tragedy? The author’s honesty appeals and seems a realistic vision of the business impact of Cobain’s death – individuals round the world suddenly pitched into the logistical, financial and organisational demands created when a major component of a system disappears unexpectedly. Intriguing to think this same process was occuring in numerous venues across Europe with whatever local variations were required.

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Comments
  1. Brutus The Barber says:

    The author of the Academy article is exaggerating though and not being entirely truthful at least i sense so.

    Nirvana’s management cancelled some shows when Kurt overdosed in Rome and they also reshecudled many remaining shows.

    A few weeks later or month later by the time Kurt had went missing BEFORE he was found dead many shows were cancelled outright BEFORE the news broke that Kurt had been found dead.
    Never heard of a planned “In Bloom” festival either. Not saying it wasn’t planned but sounds very dubious.

    Nirvana’s remaining touring commitments were Loloopooloza which their management cancelled BEFORE Kurt was found dead and the remaining In Utero european tour dates which had been rescheudeled for later but were also mostly all cancelled BEFORE Kurt was actually found dead.

    The idea tickets already sold being worth something as memorobilia as his own suggestion is also laughable and just stupid. Of course tickets for Nirvana gigs that never were were going to be of some unfortunate ‘value’ after Kurts death. The idea he alone started the chinese whispers instigator for it of being of some value of being so is completely absurd.

    As for the Sanford book well ….LOL that was just laughable book i had the misfortune to read a part of. I actually stopped reading it half way through as it just got so bad it was no longer even so bad it was good. It was just bad. Awful hack job by someone who seemed to have more issues and hang ups than Cobain ever had. I recall Endino described basic stuff like the Bleach recording session descriptions in that book as complete garbage many years back and said the book was full of pure fiction and lies.

  2. Eastcoastfella says:

    Very well put on the Sanford book. That was the first book I ever purchased on Cobain/Nirvana. Was probably around ’97 or so? I was shocked at what I had read and took it all as truth, not knowing any better at the time. Like what the hell was that guys problem? He just made shit up and it got published? Unreal.

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